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Blog Out in Healthcare

Out in Healthcare: Wade Robinson, OTD

Name: Wade Robinson

Pronouns: He/his

Identity: Gay man 

Background: While completing my undergraduate degree, I became passionate about the field of sexual wellness while working with various non-profit organizations that provided HIV-related services and raised scholarships for LGBTQ students. Those experiences emphasized the importance of education around sexuality, and after beginning graduate school I was delighted to discover that sexual activity is included in the domain of occupational therapy. I was able to bring OT and sexuality education together and collaborate with @sexintimacyOT for my doctoral capstone project to create a continuing education course on LGBTQ0-inclusive practice.

Profession: Occupational Therapy

Area(s) of Practice or Interest: Sexual activity and education, pediatrics, hand/orthopedics

What does being ‘Out in Healthcare’ mean to you?: I believe that generally people have many misconceptions about what it means to be LGBTQ until they know that they know LGBTQ people. In my day-to-day life, I live by the mantra of “advocacy through visibility”, and I try to do the same in a professional setting by being authentic about my own sexual identity. I think this normalizes conversations about sexuality, models to colleagues how to respond, and indicates a safe-space to clients.

What is one thing everyone should know about your identity?: Overall I think that LGBTQ visibility is a good thing, but I’ve noticed that a lot of the mainstream media highlighting LGBTQ people are pretty narrow in their scope. I just want people to check themselves for implicit biases that are easy to subscribe to and know that being gay does not mean being into interior design, subscribing to a particular style of drag, or being into drag at all for that matter. Part of allyship is celebrating LGBTQ people for their identities, so just recognize that there are countless ways for identities to differ and each is as valid as the next.

How do you feel when your identity is included?: We [LGBTQ people] have gone so long without seeing proper representation or inclusion that I definitely notice when we are included in policies and media, even with little things.

What does “taking up space” mean to you?: To me this goes back to the idea of advocacy through visibility. It’s not like I always talk about being gay, queer culture, or anything like that, but I do think it is important to share my sexual identity with the people around me. I think its personal relationships that create allies. It’s so obvious to LGBTQ people how cisnormative/heteronormative everything is by default, and that creates a lot of marginalization that the majority never considers. I think that we can use that lens for the better to recognize how other minority groups could be excluded and erased, then aim for more inclusive, mindful practice.

What is one piece of advice that you would give to healthcare workers who aren’t sure how to honor the identities of their patients?: I know for OT in particular, there are not very many resources, which is why I created the LGBTQ-inclusive course for my capstone project. For healthcare professionals in general, I think the National LGBT Health Education Center is the best resource for practice guidelines. Time in the clinic is precious and the experience is often stressful for clients; it would be very unusual that that time would be best spent with the client educating the clinician about their sexuality. Being educated about sexuality before interacting with clients is best practice. If somebody finds themselves in a situation where they still are unsure, I think the most import thing they could do is approach the situation with humility. 

Has your identity influenced healthcare that you’ve received?: There are two instances that come to mind in which providers made assumptions about me after I disclosed that I am gay, and both instances were regarding sexual health interestingly enough. The first time I was just completing a routine check-up and getting some vaccinations to start graduate school, and the physician suggested that I complete a battery of STD tests. Even after I explained that I have worked in sexual health, am very aware of my relative risks, and was current on all my tests, the physician suggested that I at least get an HIV test. The second time, the nurse told me that they were going to ask me some questions about my sexual health, but once I said that I was gay, they moved on to ask me about other areas of health. Afterwards, without knowing any of my risk factors or sexual habits, they proceeded to try to administer a test that was completely inappropriate and did not apply to me at all. At this point, I said I would not be doing that test, explained that I previously worked in sexual health, and commented that I was surprised that they did not ask more questions to assess which tests were appropriate. The nurse brushed off my response and quickly said that there were more questions on the template but they were optional to ask and this was standard procedure. 

Where can people find you?: Hidden away studying for the NBCOT exam, hiking, or on Instagram at @Wad_the_robin

Categories
Blog Travel OT

LSVT and Me

Picture property of https://www.lsvtglobal.com/
Citation

What is LSVT/ LSVT LOUD?: “LSVT LOUD is an effective speech treatment for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurological conditions.  Named for Mrs. Lee Silverman (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]), a woman living with PD, it was developed by Dr. Lorraine Ramig and has been scientifically studied for over 25 years with support from the National Institute for Deafness and other Communication Disorders within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other funding organizations. LSVT LOUD trains people with PD to use their voice at a more normal loudness level while speaking at home, work, or in the community. Key to the treatment is helping people “recalibrate” their perceptions so they know how loud or soft they sound to other people and can feel comfortable using a stronger voice at a normal loudness level.” (LSVT GLOBAL)

While LSVT LOUD treatment has helped people in all stages of PD, the majority of research has been on those in moderate stages of the disease. LSVT LOUD has also helped people with atypical parkinsonisms, such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and has recently shown promise for adults with speech issues arising from stroke or multiple sclerosis and children with cerebral palsy or Down syndrome. Beginning your work with LSVT LOUD before you’ve noticed significant problems with voice, speech and communication will often lead to the best results, but it’s never too late to start. LSVT LOUD has the potential to produce significant improvements even for people facing considerable communication difficulties.” (LSVT GLOBAL)

(Direct quotes from LSVT GLOBAL)

What is LSVT BIG?: “LSVT BIG trains people with Parkinson disease (PD) to use their body more normally.  People living with PD or other neurological conditions often move differently, with gestures and actions that become smaller and slower. They may have trouble with getting around, getting dressed and with other activities of daily living. LSVT BIG effectively trains improved movements for any activity, whether “small motor” tasks like buttoning a shirt or “large motor” tasks like getting up from sofa or chair or maintaining balance while walking. The treatment improves walking, self-care and other tasks by helping people “recalibrate” how they perceive their movements with what others actually see. It also teaches them how and when to apply extra effort to produce bigger motions – more like the movements of everyone around them.” (LSVT GLOBAL)

Because LSVT BIG treatment is customized to each person’s specific needs and goals, it can help regardless of the stage or severity of your condition. That said, the treatment may be most effective in early or middle stages of your condition, when you can both improve function and potentially slow further symptom progression. Beginning your work with LSVT BIG before you’ve noticed significant problems with balance, mobility or posture will often lead to the best results, but it’s never too late to start. LSVT BIG can produce significant improvements even for people facing considerable physical difficulties.” (LSVT GLOBAL)

(Direct quotes from LSVT GLOBAL)

Method: Completed the online certification program (also an in-person program with same materials) I would personally would have done the in-class program if it were available to take around me and with the changes associated with COVID I was limited to the online course. I am a hands-on learner but still feel prepared to implement a LSVT program via the online certification course. Certification acquired by completion of LSVT Global’s LSVT BIG Online Course Modules (40) while achieving an 85% or higher on the final examination.

Time: 12.5 hours of course material with average of 16 hours of completion for clinicians, over 90 day period. If you need extra time, you can purchase extensions in 30 day increments. I used almost all of the 90 days (83 days total) to complete the course. Some barriers were working full time, traveling between multiple areas (travel therapy), and lack of motivation to start. Once I completed the first 5 or so modules, I was able to speed through multiple modules at a time. 

Cost: $580.00, $50.00 every two years for renewal. Fortunately, with a bonus from extending my travel placement, I was able to cover the cost of the certification.

Program: At least 4 1-hour sessions per week for 4 weeks, with daily exercises and tasks to completed outside of clinic time. If a patient requires additional time then you continue the program, with supportive documentation and assessment. Consists of 7 daily exercises, functional component tasks, carryover tasks, and hierarchy tasks. Facilitation of the program includes specific and simple cues from the clinician, with the use of modeling and tactile cuing techniques. There is daily homework for the patients that must be completed for the best outcome. 

Why I chose to pursue the LSVT BIG certification as an Occupational Therapist: I have always loved all thing neuro/neuro rehab! I have started the quest to enhance my knowledge in neuro-focused areas through continuing education unit courses (CEUs), certification programs, books, journal articles, podcasts, and research articles. In my year and a half long career thus far as an OT, I have worked with many individuals who live with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease (PD). I briefly learned about the certification course (LSVT BIG) in college and also know friends/colleagues that had already obtained the certification. I have always heard positive reports about the LSVT program and decided to look into in further. An online course was the best option for me and I was in a financial position to purchase the course so I decided to go for it. I am also looking into the Impact OT (ITOT) certification and the Certified Brain Injury Specialist (CBIS) certification for the near future to continue on my neuro-focused journey!

Pros of LSVT Certification/Program: Set protocol to follow, but also individualized based on client’s goals and functional needs. Can be completed in multiple settings, and initiated by a LSVT certified OT in SNF and completed by LSVT OT in HH. The program is evidence-based. The exercises and task are modifiable to patient performance level, with multiple options on grading the activities up/down as absolutely needed. When the certification program is purchased, one receives an LSVT resource book with the modules, exercises, and handouts inside (also available online). I started with re-writing all of the notes from the modules by hand because I didn’t want to wait for the resource book to arrive, as I usually start with this method for studying. I would recommend just waiting for the book or taking online notes if that’s more your style, because re-writing by hand definitely slowed down my completion of the modules. The program has a ton of built in repetition so if you have to complete it in chunks like I did then this is really helpful. There is also a quiz at the end of each module to check for learning of objectives and course material. The repetition and quizzes made it so I had minimal final exam prep to do. The LSVT BIG program is able to be generalized to other neuro populations as long as they meet certain criteria. 

Cons of LSVT Certification/Program: A patient must complete at least 4 weeks, with 4 1-hr session per week, as the evidence only supports a program of this length or more. Program is more affordable than a lot of certifications, but cost is still a barrier to obtaining certification. Program not yet available via telehealth.

Overall, I think the LSVT BIG certification program for Occupational Therapists is worth it!

Categories
Blog Travel OT

Experiences as a Home Health OT in Multiple States

During my travel therapy career, I have worked in California, New York, and am also licensed in/planning to work in Colorado. So far, I have worked in subacute inpatient rehabilitation and home health settings, with more placements in home health at this time.

To be as transparent as possible, my time in home health in California was less than desirable. Not because of the setting itself, but because of the company I was working for. This was my first job after passing the OT board exam. My best friend and long time education partner, Sydney, and I drove from Rochester, NY to San Jose, CA to start travel therapy together.

The company I signed a contract with required me to cover two areas, including but not limited to: Antioch, Orinda, Vacaville, Vallejo, Rio Vista, Concord, Bethel Island, and Oakland. San Jose was a halfway point (or so we thought) for both Sydney and myself to commute to our respective work areas. Sydney was working in school-based pediatric, covering a county. Unbeknownst to the both of us, California traffic is no joke, especially in the Bay Area. I had to commute approximately an hour and a half to two hours to see my first client, and then repeat that for my drive home. I had to see six patients a day, with most of them being evaluations, revisits, and discharges. My orientation consisted of a three day in-class lecture series and no field training. At the time, I had no understanding of the coveted home health point system, from which your productivity is calculated. Thankfully, productivity was never mentioned for me, so I would be safe to assume I was meeting their requirement. We were provided with a bag including wipes, soap, sanitizer, barrier sheets, a laptop, a work cellphone, charging cord, theraband, and theraputty. Though I am thankful for the resources provided, the laptop was cumbersome to carry around and needed to be charged 2-3x per day. As a practitioner that is focused on providing quality, evidence-based, and client-centered therapy, I took most of my documentation home with me. Another part of home health is regularly scheduling patients, calling MDs or related providers, and coordinating with schedulers and office staff. So, with the daily commute to and from the areas, patient care, and documentation, I regularly spent 16-18 hours per day doing work or completing work-related tasks. In retrospect, I was in the perfect environment for burnout and that’s exactly where I landed. I specifically remember breaking down on the phone with my recruiter because I just couldn’t do it anymore. We were able to work a new system out with the OT supervisor due to an opportunity for me to move my area to San Jose. My commute drastically decreased and I was spending 8-12 hours per day on work and work-related tasks, though I was almost always behind on documentation due to a high-level of burnout. I made an effort to battle the burnout with weekly trips to various National Parks and hikes in Northern California, and completed daily documentation outside at parks or near the beach as much as possible. The contract was originally for 13 weeks, and we extended to 16 weeks to take us right up to Christmas time. There was an offer to return after the holidays, but I knew that my time with that company needed to end. Sydney also experienced burnout covering an entire county of under-served pediatric populations and decided to stay at home and not return to travel therapy. I am so thankful for having her with me for that journey, I really don’t know how I would have made it out of their with the little bit of energy that I had left without her.

A year later, I finally encouraged a close friend Sara to jump into the travel therapy world with me. We got lucky with an offer of two contracts with the same company, in the same area of NY. I was resistant to accepting another home health contract due to my previous experience, but I knew it was fair to give the setting another try with a new company. Due to gained experience both as a practitioner and interviewer/interviewee, I was able to determine that this company had an ethical outlook, manageable coverage area, and manageable productivity expectation. With the added bonus of working for the same company, Sara and I jumped on the opportunity and were both offered contracts with the company. Their orientation was a full week, with class time and field time. It was refreshing to have training under an OT preceptor, just to learn the ropes of the tablet and company operations. We were provided with the same protective equipment and bag, a balance pad, cones, a gait belt, a car charger, a tablet (instead of laptop), theraband, and theraputty. I covered one area that consisted of a cluster of 5-6 towns within a 30 minute radius, which seemed rather easy when compared to the 60 minute radius that I covered in California. I worked with a few COTAs in the area who took over a majority of my routine visits. Halfway through the contract, I moved to an area closer to where my partner and I were living and worked with one COTA, Shekera, who is out-of-this-world amazing. I extended my contract to mid-may with the company, though my contract was cut short due to PDGM. I was served a 30-day notice per my contract, and recently ended my contract on March 20th. The caseload was much more manageable, the scheduler and certain patient care managers were incredibly supportive. I was lucky to work with an amazing COTA, and didn’t have much experience with COTA supervision during my time in CA. The change to the Patient Driven Grouping Model (PDGM) did make working in the home health setting in general more difficult. The home health company I signed on with was bought out by a larger home health company shortly before my contract began. The company that shall not be named did continue to seek financial gain and stray from quality patient care in response to PDGM, in my opinion. The frequency of therapy visits was cut, there were conversations regarding cases being OT or PT only, and that OTs/PTs could cover each other’s scopes of practice, and OTRs became evaluation and discharge machines, while COTAs took over most routine visits. Through persistent advocacy and discussion, were were able to get the director to agree to providing the necessary visits per the practitioners discretion in order to meet each individual’s needs.

Pros: I enjoy the home health setting due to the fact that we get to evaluate, assess, and plan to provide interventions in an individuals natural environment. As an OT, what is better than that? I love the creativity that is required to use available resources and collaborate with a client to complete tasks they need to get through each day, with the greatest level of safety and independence. I love the change of environment throughout the day and ability to binge music or podcasts during the commute to each patient.

Cons: Even with a mobile tablet, I found that I continued to take work home with me. I don’t know about you, but when I get home I want to be completely done with work that is required of me. I found that I cannot compromise on maximizing direct client and face to face time during visits, as home health visits are not always lengthy in nature. If you own a car, expect to rack up some serious mileage. Though not an issue in California, hazardous weather can affect productivity and ability to see patients, especially in a state like New York during the winter months. The time spent on technology, whether it was my phone or tablet, was frustrating. In a time of technology, I found it difficult to step away from my phone or tablet and enjoy parts of my day. As someone who is 6’1″, the time in the car and looking at technology throughout the day definitely took a toll on my body.

Overall, I don’t think home health is my happiest place. I am thankful for my experience in the setting. As someone who strives to enter academia in the future, my experiences will allow me to share valuable information and speak on the reality of the setting.

References of OT practice guidelines and COTA Supervision:

California: https://www.bot.ca.gov/forms_pubs/supervision_faqs.shtml

New York: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/ot/part76.htm

AOTA:https://www.aota.org/~/media/Corporate/Files/Advocacy/State/Resources/Supervision/MSRSOTA.pdf

Categories
Blog

My story

I always found the idea of ‘coming out’ as strange or forced, but like many other LGBTQIA+ individuals I went through the same process on my journey to self-discovery and establishing my identity. I came out “officially” at the age of 17, or as I would prefer to say it, I started to let people in to who I am at 17. That is the same age that I decided to pursue an education in occupational therapy.

I applied to 9 schools originally and decided to attend D’Youville College in Buffalo, NY for my combined BS and MS of human occupation and occupational therapy. OT school was challenging, energizing, and fulfilling. I was fortunate to have incredible faculty, family, and friends who supported and challenged me with my crazy ideas like starting a community wellness clinic on campus or creating the official D’Youville OT instagram page – which is where the idea of @therainbowot grew from.

It was during professional development lecture in my final year of OT school where I found enough passion and frustration to start my lifelong mission for enhancing education, inclusion, representation, and advocacy for those within the LGBTQIA+ community, inside and outside of healthcare settings. I was so excited in class when we finally had a lecture where part of the class discussion was designated to address LGBT topics in OT. There was an objective to cover vast cultures including Korean and Latinx culture in a two hour span, leaving little time to cover all of the material, including LGBT+ topics. Without saying any names, it was clear to me that the professor was unprepared to answer questions about LGBT+ topics, especially those surrounding trans individuals – so the spotlight was turned to me (the token gay person). This wasn’t a new situation to me or the first time that I was placed with the responsibility to discuss LGBT+ topics in a class. I remember feeling powerful, frustrated, and concerned. There is a great amount of pressure when discussing topics and identities of the LGBT+ community, especially when my identity of being a white, gay, male (sex) does not come close to representing the entire community. It’s important to note that at the time of this class, I hadn’t really started acknowledging my non-binary identity, so I identified as a male. My concern came from the fact that I was one student, unable to represent or educate on all LGBT+ topics in only one section of the class. What did the other sections talk about? Did they discuss what it means to be trans? Did anyone validate the trans identity or provide definitions for the letters of the acronym? From there, the fire was lit to go on my own path of providing education and resources to anyone regarding these topics and more.

Where are we now? Well, The Rainbow OT has been running for just about a year. I launched my first LGBTQIA+ 101 series, a pronoun promise campaign, and have been a guest on two podcasts discussing LGBT+ related topics and occupational therapy’s role. With the support and safe space provided for friends that I owe the world to, I was able to let others in to who I am, a proud non-binary individual. I’m still in the beginning of my journey to self-discovery, but I am so happy with where I am when I look back at where I was. Where are we going next? You’ll just have to tag along and see.

XX,

Devlynn Neu

They/Them

The Rainbow OT

Categories
Resources

LGBTQIA+ Resources for Healthcare Providers, Clients, and Families:

 

BIPOC LGBTQIA+ Resources:

The Okra Project: Collective that seeks to address the global crisis faced by Black Trans people by brining home-cooked meals and resources to the community. www.theokraproject.org

House of GG: Creating safe and transformative spaces for community to heal, and nurturing them into tomorrow’s leaders, focusing on trans women of color in the south. www.houseofgg.org

The Marsha P. Johnson Institute: Defends the rights of Black transgender people.

National Queer & Trans Therapists of Color Network: A network committed to transforming mental health for queer and trans people of color.

Brave Space Alliance: A Black-led,Trans-led LGBTQ Center working on the South Side of Chicago. @bracespacealliance

Black Trans TV: A digital media platform used to promote unity and dismantle the idea that Black queer/trans folx exist separately from the black community.

SNAPCO: Builds power of Black Trans and queer people to force systemic divestment from the prison industrial complex and invest in community support. www.snap4freedom.org

The Brown Boi Project: A community of masculine center womxn, men two-spirit people, transmen, and our allies committed to transforming our privilege of masculinity, gender, and race into tools for achieving racial and gender justice. Located in Oakland, CA. http://www.brownboiproject.org

The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC): A civil rights organization dedicated to empowering Black lesbians, black, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. NBJC’s mission is to end racism and homophobia. http://nbjc.org/

The National Black Gay Men’s Advocacy Coalition (NBGMAC): The NBGMAC is committed to improving the health and well-being of Blac gay men through advocacy that is focused on research, policy, education, and training. https://www.nbgmac.org/

Zuna Institute: A National Advocacy Organization for Black Lesbians that was created to address the needs of Black Lesbians in the areas of health, public policy, economic development, and education. http://www.zunainstitute.org/

Black Trans Travel Fund: Works on providing resources to Black trans women to be able to access safe transportation and travel alternatives.

TGI Justice Project: A group of transgender, gender variant, and intersex people – inside and outside of prisons, jails, and detention center – fighting against human rights abuses, imprisonment, police violence, racism, poverty, and societal pressures

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network (NQTTCN): The NQTTCN is a healing justice organization that actively works to transform mental health for queer and trans people of color in North America. Together we build the capacity of QTPoC (queer and trans people of color) mental health practitioners, increase access to healing justice resources, provide technical assistance to social justice movement organizations to integrate healing justice into their work. Our overall goal is to increase access to healing justice resources for QTPoC. https://www.nqttcn.com/

Black Visions Collective is a trans- and queer-led social-justice organization and legal fund based in Minneapolis-St. Paul. https://www.blackvisionsmn.org/about

The National Center for Black Equity connects members of the Black LGBTQ+ community with information and resources to empower their fight for equity and access. https://centerforblackequity.org/

Black AIDS Institute: Working to end the Black HIV epidemic through policy, advocacy and high-quality direct HIV services. www.blackaids.org

National Black Justice Coalition: A civil rights organization dedicated to empowering Black LGBTQ+ people. http://nbjc.org/

The LGBTQ+ Freedom Fund: posts bail to secure the safety and liberty of people in jail and immigration detention. https://www.lgbtqfund.org/

Incite!: A national activist organization of trans and gender nonconforming people of color working to end violence against individuals and communities through direct action, dialogue, and grassroots organizing. https://incite-national.org/

Trans Women of Color Collective: A network of dedicated cultivating sustainable projects for and by transgender women of color.

Black Transmen: A nonprofit organization focused on social advocacy and empowering trans men with resources to aid in a healthy transition. https://blacktransmen.org/

Black AIDS Institute: works to end the Black HIV epidemic through policy, advocacy, and high-quality direct HIV services. https://blackaids.org/

For the Gworls: raisesmoney to assist wtih Black trans people’s rent & affirmative surgeries. https://www.facebook.com/forthegworls

Black Trans Femmes in the Arts: A collective of Black trans women and non-binary femmes who are dedicated to creating space for Black trans femmes in the arts. @btfacollective

By Us For Us: A collective of queer, femme, and non-binary Black and POC artists and organizers. @Bufu_byusforus

Know Your Rights Camp: Works to
advance the liberation and well-being of black and brown communities through education, self-empowerment, mass-mobilization, and the creation of new systems that elevate the next generation of change leaders.

UCSC QTBIPOC: Queer & Trans Black, Indigenous, People of  Color Resource Page. https://queer.ucsc.edu/resources/qpoc.html

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LGBTQIA+ Resources:

Trans Justice Funding Project: Community-led funding
initiative to support grassroots trans justice groups
run by and for trans people. www.transjusticefundingproject.org

Sex and Intimacy OT: Our mission is to dismantle restrictive norms related to sexuality and intimacy which limit clients and limit ourselves. We strive to promote understanding, respect, and empowerment for individuals as sexual beings. https://www.sexintimacyot.com/

Transgender Law Center offers legal resources to advance the rights of transgender and gender nonconforming people. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/

Reclaim: Resources for Queer and Trans youth. https://www.reclaim.care/what-we-do/resources-for-queer-and-trans-youth.html

National Center for Transgender Equality: Advocates to change policies and society to increase understanding and acceptance of transgender people. In the nation’s capital and throughout the country, NCTE works to replace disrespectl discrimination, and violence with empathy, opportunity, and justice. https://transequality.org/

Sex Love and OT: a sexuality, mental health, and OT advocate,
writer, and practitioner. Dr. Tickoo works as a school-based OT in Mumbai, however her work is not limited to kids. Dr. Tickoo’s work explores the integration of sexuality in OT practices for people of all ages. www.sexloveandot.in

Youth Breakout: Works to end the criminalization of the
LGBTQ+ youth in New Orleans to build a safer and more just community. www.youthbreakout.org

Black AIDS Insititute: Working to end the Black HIV epidemic
through policy, advocacy and high-quality direct HIV servicers. www.blackaids.org

Trans Cultural District: The world’s first-ever legally recognized Trans district, which aims to stabilize and economically empower the Trans community. www.transgenderdistrictsf.com

LGBTQ+ Freedom Fund: Posts bail LGBTQ people held in jail or immigrant detention and raises awareness of the epidemic LGBTA over-incarceration. www.lgbtqfund.org

The Network for LGBTQIA+ Occupational Therapists. http://www.otnetwork.org/

The LGBT OT, resource for LGBT+ specific OT practice and clients. By: Jadyn Sharber, MSOT, OTR/L. https://www.lgbtq-ot.com/

The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging (SAGE) Advocacy for LGBT+ Adult and Elderly Populations. https://www.lgbtagingcenter.org/

GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing LGBTQ
Equality 
(previously known as the Gay & Lesbian Medical
Association). http://www.glma.org/

LGBTData.com serves as a no-cost, open-access clearing house for the collection of sexual orientation & gender identity data and measures. (By Dr. Randall Sell). http://www.lgbtdata.com/

NALGAP: The Association of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Addiction Professionals and Their Allies is a membership organization founded in 1979 and dedicated to the prevention and treatment of alcoholism, substance abuse, and other addictions in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer communities. http://www.nalgap.org/

Healthy People 2020: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/lesbian-gay-bisexual-and-transgender-health

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is working with national and local organizations to endure the LGBT community get quality health insurance and health care information. https://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Outreach/Partnerships/LGBT

Coalition of Occupational Therapy Advocates for Diversity (COTAD): The Coalition of Occupational Therapy Advocates for Diversity (COTAD) formed in 2014 through a collaboration that occurred between members of the AOTA Emerging Leaders Development Program. COTAD has grown tremendously since its early days and has added individuals to its Executive Board and general membership. Now established as a non-profit organization, COTAD operates as group of individuals from across the United States all working towards a common goal of promoting diversity and inclusion within the occupational therapy workforce and increase the ability to occupational therapy practitioners to serve an increasingly diverse population. COTAD’s new Ignite Series: https://www.cotad.org/ignite-series 

COTAD-logo-v01 copy

LGBTQIA+ Educational Podcast Episodes:

https://otafterdark.com/

https://ot4lyfe.com/35/

https://seniorsflourish.com/sexuality-identity-occupational-therapy/

www.occupiedpodcast.com/074